FRI

06:00 PM

Atruim

Sam Trump Music Performance and Q&A

Sam Trump Sam Trump will perform several songs and have a Q&A session about his activism and artwork. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWpxnPhHzik[/embed] As an artist, we have to think about setting a tone for the future and the people who are looking up to us. I am one of those artists who feel we have to take responsibility for what we put out. Eventually, I want to have some type of hub, organization or label that develops artists and gets other people’s art out,” he says, adding, I’d love to form a company that gives back to people and helps youth.
Art

08:00 PM

Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

Paintings Inspired by the Ferguson Protest

 Ted Gillespie Friday, May 19 Gallery Reception, Innovation Lab As an artist, I did a series of paintings inspired by the Ferguson protests, the police brutality and the fear, anger, and rage that came with it. Hopefully, my work will make you question your own beliefs, what are you actually seeing, verses what you think you see. I want my work make the viewer ask personal questions, and perhaps even recoil at times. Attached you will see some of my work and the rest, you can see on my website. As an artist, I did a series of paintings inspired by the Ferguson protests, the police brutality and the fear, anger, and rage that came with it. Hopefully, my work will make you question your own beliefs, what are you actually seeing, versus what you think you see. I want my work to make the viewer ask personal questions, and perhaps even recoil at times. Attached you will see some of my work and the rest, you can see on my website. As an artist, I did a series of paintings inspired by the Ferguson protests, the police brutality and the fear, anger, and rage that came with it. Hopefully, my work will make you question your own beliefs, what are you actually seeing, verses what you think you see. I want my work to make the viewer ask personal questions, and perhaps even recoil at times. Attached you will see some of my work and the rest, you can see on my website.

08:00 PM

Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

The Work of Their Hands

Shalom Watts Friday, May 19th  Gallery Reception Room 3112 I believe that you can learn a lot about a person based on the work of their hands. I also believe that physically engaging in exploring a concept through a visual medium can provide insights that you can't necessarily put words to. I would like to use my exhibit to demonstrate how this has been true. With my artwork,  I created a story which explores my identity as a bi-racial woman.  The basis of my show is displaying my family history, using images of the work of my ancestors/family's hands. These images are on plates. The ideal location of the plates is at a dining room table, because of the intersection of family and identity that happens at a dinner table.

08:00 PM

Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

MY EYE LIDS ARE LOADED

Alex Wells Shapiro The piece is a critique of the way legislation is constructed, making it difficult for the common person to understand or even read fully. It is also a critique of the way information about said legislation is disseminated by the media; through headlines addressing a single portion of a massive bill. From a young age, I have been repetitively shown stereotypes of what a Hispanic person is supposed to be, or what a Jewish person is supposed to be. I think this happens to people from all backgrounds in America. From a young age, those images become a part of our worldview and self-evaluation subconsciously. Eventually, one must break free of that lens and construct their own from world experience, but the world's imposed views on a person's background can stick with you. This piece is a representation of the lens I see the world through as a mixed race man.

08:00 PM

Gallery Space, Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

They Dance for the Negro

Brittney Leeanne Williams Friday, May 19 Gallery Space, Innovation Lab 3rd Floor "They Dance for the Negro" Acrylic on Paper 11inx11in "They Sing for the Negro" Acrylic on Paper 12inx12in "Blood Baptism From Above" Acrylic on Paper 23inx30in "Don't Worry the Grass Will Grow" Acrylic on Paper 11inx11in Pool Parties With Fences Acrylic on Panel 8inx10in Six Little Monkeys in a Concrete Jungle Acrylic on Paper 31inx41in Negros Walk By Two Behind Bars Acrylic on Panel 16inx24in

08:00 PM

Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

Resistance Art Within Various Movements

Naimah Thomas Friday, May 19 Gallery Reception, Innovation Lab 3rd Floor Art, specifically resistance art within various movements has always challenged what we consider as art. Placing marginalized people in the center as a way of changing dominant narratives often spoon fed to the masses. I seek to use my artist and therapist identity in collaboration through artistic expression. To begin exploring what resistance means to me while honoring the work of my ancestors. I am at the beginning of my journey and I have barely scratched the surface, but I am to research the researcher and explore what resistance means to me through a series of drawings.

02:00 PM

Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

Life: Spoken Word

Zedrienne Bell Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:30pm Innovation Lab 3rd Floor
SAT

09:00 AM

All-Day-Session Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

Protest Music Composition Workshop

Hana Masud, Sonja Hilson , Elias Olson, Oromo Kenyatta, Charles DeShields Saturday, May 20 All-Day-Session Room 3112 An all day workshop where participants can work on songs of protest with a group of young musicians.
9am

09:00 AM

Room 4043

Best Practices for African Americans and Racial Justice Advocates in Light of the “New Racism

Geraldine (Geri) Palmer, Ph.D. Saturday, May 20 9am-9:50am Room 4043 Just what is the “new racism”? In the past two decades, the concept of a “new racism” has surfaced (Leah, 2005). Miles (1993) further noted that in the absence of a formal system of segregation and other blatant forms of racism, the “new racism” is found in systems such as persistent inequality, microaggressions, injustice, racial differentiation and possibly media practices that consistently portray negative images of Black/African Americans. More current, Bouie (2014) remarked that “First you deny racism exists. Then you smear the reputation of any Black man who appears to be a victim” (para. 1). Just what does Bouie mean by this?

09:00 AM

Room 4043

Come and explore Bouie’s statement and other thoughts in an informal setting as we grapple with the concept and implications of a new racism!

Deveda Francois Saturday, May 20 9am-9:50 am Room 4043 In this Roundtable, we will discuss how this concept is affecting African Americans now, and suggest ways to resist. For example, by adding language to our narratives about race and racism that doesn’t negate its brutal history or continued existence, but also speaks to the strength, resiliency and power of African Americans, as a strategy, is important.

09:00 AM

Room 4022

Environmental Injustice: Historical and Modern Day Overview of the Political Disenfranchisement of Communities of Color

Dominique D. Edwards, M.A. Saturday, May 20 9am-9:50 am Room 4022 The shared ecosystem between the Southeast Side of Chicago, Illinois and Northwest Indiana has been a generational victim of environmental injustice. Environmental injustice, also referred to as environmental racism, is known as the disproportionate exposure to environmental harms in low-income minority communities. Fourth World Theory is known as an extension of the Third World, where it observes groups of people living in a First World nation in environments that are deemed less than suitable.In regards to environmental injustice, some communities of color do not have access to clean air, water, and soil. In this presentation, we will observe how environmental injustice has shaped the current infrastructure of American cities over the past several decades, and how grassroots movements have inspired generations of leaders to seek justice where political leaders have not.

09:00 AM

Room 4014

The Evolution of Ernestine: Tracing the Construction of Black Female Archetypes and the Associated Fragmentation of Black Womanhood in the Americas

Wytress Richardson, Ericka Mingo Saturday, May 20 9am-9:50am Room 4014 Ernestine Wade is an American Actress best known for her role as Sapphire Stevens on the television show Amos and Andy. Some credit this character with early associations of Black women with anger and vulgarity. In an effort to deconstruct myths of Black womanhood, we are working to trace stereotypes back to their source, in order to better understand the spaces in which they have been disseminated since inception. We hope to further understand how these spaces impact modern life for Black women in the process of reassembling healthy families, communities, Pan-African collaborations, and self-perception.

09:00 AM

Room 4020

Poverty is Racist

Anwar Masud Saturday, May 20 9am-9:50am Room 4020 Poverty is Racist No one is born racist but as time progresses people develop a prejudiced trait where they “must” label individuals’ abilities based on their ethnicity just to adapt with society’s norm. Jenkins explained that even though Jim Crow’s law has disappeared, the favoritism of “white only” still exists in the USA, leading the poverty rate against African Americans and Latinos to be “2.6 times greater than whites” (Dario B, 2015) In addition the probability of whites being cut off from the assistance of “health care, housing, quality schools, and other pathways out of poverty” is less likely when compared to people of color. (Dario B, 2015) Giving the whites more resources allows the whites to remain in an on going cycle of superiority over the people of color even when it comes to poverty. The resolution is as long as the white remains superior over the people of color regardless of the circumstances will allow them to remain the race in higher rank for centuries. Employers in the US evaluate many candidates’ resumes that are more than qualified to hire but based on their ethnicity they won’t be “qualified” leading to financial instability as a result. Different states around the USA acceptance rate for job applications are more preposterous from the other. Some people believe that people of color are simply less qualified but the evidence around the states shows qualification doesn’t matter. In Milwaukee, those who were white and had a criminal record had better chances of getting a job compared to people of color with no criminal records. In Boston and Chicago, they would have this “system” where applicants were split into two categories based on their names. For instance, if an applicants had a white name such as “Emily Jones” and another applicant with a black name such as “DeShawn Smith” the white names were at a 50 percent chance rate higher to receive callbacks than black names. (Greenhaven Press, 2007) This discrimination is not only subjected to blacks, but in addition to Asian Americans, Native American, Latinos and Muslim Americans. These minority groups have repeatedly confirmed receiving insufficient information in terms of resourceful jobs and housing stabilities because the information would purposely steer them from integrating with the white race.
10am

10:00 AM

Room  4052

Not Quite: Asian American by Law, Asian Woman by Desire

Ada Cheng Saturday, May 20 10am-11:20am Room 4052 In this solo performance, a mixture of monologues and stories, I use "not quite" to explore several main themes: meanings of home(land), the institutionalization of the alien status, the fractured nature of Asian American identity, and politics of intersectional identities. I intend this performance to be an intervention and a challenge to current politics and to connect communities with shared as well as different experiences shaped by the current racial regime. This is my way of resistance as a storyteller-artist-scholar. The discussion will be followed by the performance.

10:00 AM

Room 4054

Using the Satir Model, a Systemic and Experiential Theory of Couple and Family Therapy

Cherry Tolbert Saturday, May 20 10am-11:30am Room 4054 This workshop presentation will highlight Virginia Satir’s communication stances within systemic and Family therapy. The presenter along with the audience, will analyze its parallel nature to how people within privileged and subjugated positions react and interact with systemic oppression. Because of the experiential nature of this particular theory within Couple and Family therapy, this will be an interactive and engaging workshop which calls for movement, impartiality, and being willing to step outside of one’s comfort. The presenter will lastly provide the audience with ways to be more congruent with oneself and others when thinking about ways to dismantle social and psychological oppression.

10:00 AM

Room 4050

The Diminishing Effects of Mass Incarceration

LaShawn LittriceEbony ThomasKaren Motley Saturday, May 20 10am-11:20am Room 4050 Mass Incarceration is a systemic issue that has affected many families, communities and individual's lives. There are not many that have not been affected to some degree. If we examine the climate of this country, there are several reasons why prison has become a regular form of business. As we discuss this, we will review information that shows how systems have been designed to incarcerate minorities at alarming rates. Now there is an increase in women being incarcerated. The crisis is at the forefront of many conversations, but what is being done to break this cycle. Let's talk about the dynamic of Mass Incarceration and let's proposal solutions to create a different narrative.

10:00 AM

Room 4014

What is your Race?

Gordon LeeNorma SeldonHana MasudSonja Hilson Saturday, May 20 10am-11:20am Room 4014 To create an atmosphere encouraging honest open dialogue of racial, social, religious, and socio-economic barriers to oppression and resistance, in order to create a diverse and eye-opening outlook on how these ideologies have shaped the way we interact in our everyday lives. As facilitators our goal is set the up the session in a manner which is non-combative yet encourages participants to be open and honest while keeping participant responses anonymous. we invite all to join our conversation on race teachers, activists, students, social workers from different ethnicities blacks, Arabs, Hispanics, whites, women, and men. The participants are subjected to confrontations of their inferiority, culturally biased, social status, and discrimination. the goal of the session is to make participants permanently more empathetic and sensitive to the problem of racism.

10:00 AM

Room 4016

Creating Space for Conversations about Race and Economic Justice

Crystal Harris PhDRieko MiakunyLeslie GrangeSharice Wright Saturday, May 20 10am-11:20pm Room 4014 Creating Space for Conversations about Race and Economic Justice In this session, presenters will describe outcomes in an undergraduate psychology course that included civic engagement projects to address issues of privilege, stigma, and oppression. Students engaged in service learning activities around poverty and social class. One of the goals was to increase students’ awareness of bias. Bias around race, gender and social class is often implicit in the curriculum as well as in classroom interactions. Presenters will share examples from the course and explore the relationship between civic engagement and student activism. Discussions about race and social class often lead to tension as some students become defensive when hearing experiences of stigma or oppression. Diversity includes intersections of social identity and power differences across multiple contexts. Our ability as educators and students to have meaningful conversations about race, bias and their impact promotes both understanding and healing, In order to embrace psychology’s values, build community and respond to the complexity of our multiple social identities, students must experience and reflect on their own intersectionality as a mechanism for effecting change in their own lives and communities. We hypothesized that students who participate in these types of activities have deeper understanding about social identity and stigma, higher levels of engagement in the course, and are more interested in civic engagement after the course. These outcomes were measured by retention in the course, attendance, engagement in course material, and reflective writing assignments. In this roundtable discussion, participants will discuss levels of student engagement how this approach could be generalized to expand awareness and interest in racial and economic justice beyond the classroom.

10:00 AM

Room 5008

Project Criminal Couture

Emily Kissner Saturday, May 20 10am-11:20am Room 5008 "Project “Criminal” Couture (PCC) is a collaboration between a small group incarcerated and non-incarcerated artists/activists, and performers. We bring the voices of the imprisoned to the public while critiquing the prison industrial complex. We seek to combat oppressive systems through performance art, while adorned in visually stunning couture garments." Title: Meditations on Escapism Therapy Written by: Emily Kissner and Corzell Cole Run Time: 25minutes, 15minute Q & A. Synopsis: "Meditations on Escapism Therapy" is a short 4 act play written by Corzell Cole and Emily Kissner. Corzell is a currently incarcerated, self-taught poet, scholar and barber. Corzell maintains his humanity despite an ominous 53year sentence for a crime he was wrongfully convicted of as a teen by maintaining connections with his beloved children as well as working on poetry or raps and connecting other incarcerated artists with folks on the outside. Emily is trained as an art therapist but aligns herself more deeply with radical artist, activist and prison abolitionist identities. This work is based on hundreds of phone conversations had by the two during a 3year artistic collaboration. Therefore, the play references the 30 minute “prison phone call. However, a call that roams in and out of reality into realms of poetic expression, systemic critique, and personal narrative. The two friends explore surreal escape plans, business ideas, dreams/nightmares and muddle over day to day activities that incarcerated people enact in order to maintain some connection to the outside world. Saturated with poetry, this piece is a great jumping off point for conversations about the prison industrial complex and how it affects those engulfed in it on a deeply personal level. It also showcases the artistic excellence that would otherwise be lost behind the 40ft concrete walls of Stateville Prison.

10:00 AM

Room 5019

Community Connections Workshop

Jasmine Ueng-McHale Saturday, May 20 10:00am-11:20am Room 5019 Please join us for a support group to build and strengthen connections in this difficult time of division, anger, and fear in our communities.  Grow in your understanding of your emotional responses to the challenges we face now and the changes in our interactions in our social world.  Open space for your fears as a path to greater clarity and strength in your present purpose.  The workshop model is based on Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples, an attachment-based therapy, and it combines personal reflection, journaling, and discussion. Please bring a journal and pen.
Lunch

11:30 AM

Atrium

Breathing Through Fiber: Healing Through the Arts

Rochele A. Royster Saturday May 20 11:30-12:15 Atrium A workshop on using communal art making practices/ art as therapy to build community, heal and resist systemic oppression and community violence. Participants will learn how community-based art therapy can build and heal communities; intrinsically. Participants will learn about Dolls 4 Peace, an art installation to memorialize victims of gun violence while simultaneously creating a memorial of resistance by crafting dolls and learning a healing practice for self-care, empowerment, and purpose setting. Participants will take time to breathe and honor the gifts and baggage we carry as survivors, advocates, activists and social justice warriors/practitioners.
1PM

01:00 PM

Room 4020

How a Pro Se Won Justice

Joyce Hutchens Saturday, May 20 1pm-1:50pm room 4020 A seasoned educator and entrepreneur, I propose to present to audiences my captivating story about how I, a black woman with no legal, took on my former employer, the Chicago Board of Education, and won three federal appellate judges' unanimous decision reversal of a district court's ruling in my race discrimination case. I also will discuss my book,

01:00 PM

Room 4016

How Tax Increment Financing Robs US Public schools of tens of BILLIONS of Dollars Every Year

Eric Unger Saturday, May 20 1pm-1:50pm Room 4016 Tax Increment Financing is the secret program that robs US public schools of tens of BILLIONS of dollars every year. Bet you did not know that. TIFs are special taxing bodies set up by mayors and constitute an enormous unmonitored slush fund that showers billions of dollars every year on developers and other connected insiders. These funds SHOULD be going to our public schools and other local units of government. In many large cities, TIFs are part of the ongoing story of discrimination, segregation and the strip mining of public funds for private gain. This workshop will explain what TIFs are, how they play out across the civic landscape and how organizing around them can bring disparate groups and interests together. The TIF IlluminationProject (http://www.tifreports.com) has been investigating and exposing TIFs across Chicagoland since 2013 and has participated in 47 public meetings in front of over 4,700 people.

01:00 PM

Performing Arts Innovation Lab 3rd Floor

When the Self Becomes the Wall: Finding Voice and Vision through Spoken Word Poetry

Kia Watkins Copious amounts of research have illustrated the deleterious impact that direct and indirect social marginalization has on communities and members within those communities. Barriers to social justice and social equity create broader themes of psychological, physical, social and emotional problems. According to Burton and Kagen (2003) people who are marginalized have relatively little control of their lives and resources available to them; develop low self-esteem, and other pathological outcomes resultant of their socially marginal status. This performance will highlight such challenges and be a call to action to work to demolish systems that are antithetical to a social justice vision.

01:00 PM

Room 4022

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome’s Connection to Ethnic Identity and Parenting

Ebony K. Bradford-Thomas Saturday, May 20 1pm-1:50pm Room 4022 Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome is generational trauma from the slave trade.  Due to the impacts of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome, many African Americans are unaware of the impact that PTSS has on them in regards to how they connect to their ethnic identity.  PTSS and ethnic identity may impact African Americans individuals, organizations, and communities, but also families and these factors may be related to parenting styles.

01:00 PM

Room 4054

Decolonizing Stories and Walking through Borders: The Praxis of Pilgrimage, how the walls come down, how the fragmented becomes whole

Gordon LeeGlenda Duldulao Saturday, May 20  1pm-2:50pm Room 4054 Pilgrimage is a praxis that allows us to re-member the forgotten stories and to give witness to the depth of how these stories have shaped and continue to shape our individual and collective lives (shifting narratives). In particular, they allow us to name, witness, acknowledge, and reframe the “walls” and the “constructions” which have shaped a part of our and our communities’ realities (the fragmented and divided). As such, they are a powerful way to imagine, experience, reframe, and reconstruct the current divisions that exist (to make whole). Pilgrimage as a praxis engages our bodies and nakem (Ilokano critical consciousness, h*storical selfhood) to dialogue with the stories of the land and the people and thus creating spaces of liberatory learning and transformative experiences. It is in the walking, the witnessing, and the listening to each other and to the land that we begin to name and make visible our journeys towards resilience, resistance, healing and relational solidarity. Part One will be a session to introduce the general concepts and framework of de-colonial pilgrimages, using specific experiences and examples. Part Two will be an interactive workshop intended for those who would like to experience what a pilgrimage might look and feel like.  

01:00 PM

Room 4014

Self Care Yoga Workshop

Maia M. Wheeler, LCPC, ATR Saturday, May 20 1pm-2:50 Room 4052 Burnout is a state of emotional, mental, and physical exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress (Smith,et al. 2017).  Social justice and human rights activists are especially susceptible to ‘burnout’ because they put pressure on themselves to have a significant impact on the world around them (Pines 1994).  Growing evidence suggests a link between burnout and social-justice activists.  Art Therapist and Clinical Counselor Maia Wheeler ATR, LCPC, will discuss trauma, burnout, and compassion-fatigue as phenomena within activist communities, as well as share the practices of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction [MBSR] as tools to improve social and emotional wellbeing.
2pm

02:00 PM

Room 4016

Unpacking the Disability of Race in America

Michael QuaintanceDavid Feingold Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:50pm Room 4016 Race, as with disability, is a static notion; both are systemically designed designations of human value and potential intended to limit mobility through the denial of possibility, growth or change. As racialized and disabled individuals, Quaintance and Feingold have merged their voices, perspectives, and experiences in an effort to deconstruct certainties that have been used to disable the racialized and racialize the disabled. The stigma and prejudice associated with Bipolar Disorder are the driving force behind Feingold’s work.  The stigma and misappropriation of possibility associated with race and depression are the driving forces behind Quaintance’s musings.

02:00 PM

Room 4050

“Ain’t I a Woman too?:”Black women throughout the African diaspora address negative attitudes, myths and stereotypes: “Escaping the cape” to find Empowerment through Education, Awareness and directing their own narrative

Patricia LuckooDeveda Francois Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:50pm Room 4050 Black women's continued struggle to define their space among Feminist or Womanist while still seeking protection against racism, colorism, misogyny and discrimination. All of which remain embedded in the cultural and socioeconomic fabric of our societies. The malignancies of such biases have systemically and infectiously spread throughout her existence, affecting every aspect of life. From childhood into womanhood Black women's survival has hinged upon pretending that intersectionality of biases does not exist. Thereby providing an undeserved pass to society for not protecting her. Often, wearing a "cape" of avoidance viewed as the "Strong Black woman" syndrome as a protective shield from injustices. We examine ways Black women counter myths, stereotypes, and microaggressions from a global perspective and self-defined narrative.

02:00 PM

Room 4020

Perceiving the complexity and intricacies “The Wall”

Dominica McBride,PhD,Malii Brow Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:50pm Room 4020 Perceiving the complexity and intricacies "the wall" of racial injustice can be an abstract and complicated endeavor. However, in order to effectively confront and dismantle perpetual inequity, we need to have clarity around the construct. This workshop is designed to facilitate a deeper understanding and identify possible solutions around racial justice. Participants will gain a necessary experiential and cognitive understanding of this deleterious social dynamic. Learning objectives include an increased empathetic understanding of others' experiences of race-based injustice; the experience of a learning activity that they can recall and draw from as a blueprint for action as they encounter similar scenarios in their daily lives; and the process of solution generation through creative and collective problem-solving. These tools may be utilized by participants as they endeavor in the shared work of righting racial injustice in their own contexts.

02:00 PM

Room 5008

DOPE!#@$…A Racial Injustice Surrounding the Legalized Marijuana Business

Johny MullinsBryan EcholsLeroy Peters Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:50pm room 5008 Now that more states are rushing to capitalize on the benefits of cannabis, Black people are served yet another racial injustice. 70% of incarcerated persons, for marijuana possession, are Black, while states and corporations are now benefiting from its legal reform. This injustice is another slap in the face to Black people. Not only are we disproportionally represented in the criminalized spaces around cannabis, but we are also underrepresented in the new booming cannabis enterprise, whose previous incantation has left countless Black people behind bars. Only 1% of African Americans make up marijuana business owners? This round-table will look into all of the racial injustices surrounding the legal marijuana business, and seek to understand the cycles which consistently ensure poverty among Black people.

02:00 PM

Room 4014

The Implications of Disproportionality on Children of Color in the Child Welfare System

Randy Sadler Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:50pm Room 4014 Children of color are over-represented in the child welfare system when compared to their majority counterparts. This roundtable discussion will draw in its participants by exploring the inception of the Child welfare system. How this system has morphed into People of color being brought into substitute care despite when all risk factors have been taken away and Race remain, Children of Color are snatched from their families at a higher rate.

02:00 PM

Room 4043

Colonialism by Any Other Name: A Common Thread Between the Palestinian NGOs and Health Sector & Non-Profits on Chicago’s Southside

Hana Masud, Ericka Mingo Saturday, May 20 2pm-2:50pm Room 4043 This workshop examines the impact of organizations, that have received funding from donor states, in shaping Palestinian subjectivities in the context of Israeli colonial occupation and oppressive practices against the Palestinian People. The nature of the psychological health services and the use of therapeutic approaches were investigated to explore the psychological discourse that formed such services, and its effects on the production of subjectivities of the Palestinians who have received such services. Further, we will examine the ways in which nonprofits on Chicago's Southside in many ways serve to maintain those served in positions of poverty and need.

02:00 PM

Room 4022

Daring to continue DREAMing: Stories of Identity, Prejudice, Illegality and Adaptation

Monica Haydee Ramos, Claudia Marchan Saturday, May 20 1pm-1:50pm Room 4022 Identity is a complex concept. Making sense of the concept of identity of young men and women, who did not migrate from Mexico to the United States by choice, must not be left out of the binational immigration discourse. Current times in policy, cultural understanding, racialization and immigration call for more research and advocacy to elevate the voices of immigrant youth living in the US. Equally important is the understanding and recognition of the stories of returning youth, who once lived in the United States and immersed themselves in the American culture, language, ways of doing, and now started a new life back in Mexico. This presentation intends to illustrate their concept of identity and introduce the issues that emerged from conversations with Dreamers from both sides of the border.  
3pm

03:00 PM

Room 4022

Latina/o Testimonio on College Degree Completion: Reflecting on your personal Praxis

Diana SorianoJorge Sanchez Saturday, May 20 3pm-3:30pm Room 4022 In this session, we will share our praxis as doctoral students and data on the educational college attainment of Latina/o students at a national level. Addressing the educational inequalities perpetuated in our education system is critical. The Latina/o student population has high college enrollment rates and fewer retention and graduation rates. The U.S. Census Bureau (2010) reported that 14% of the Latino student population earned a bachelor's degree, 2% master's degree, and a mere 0.7% earned a doctoral degree. We encourage you to reflect on your praxis and share your personal testimonio in combating oppression in your educational spaces.

03:00 PM

Room 4052

Meeting the Needs of an Increasingly Diverse Learning Population

Eric Hopkins Saturday, May 20 3pm-3:50pm Room 4052 I will be giving a brief of a presentation I did with my fellow staff members. The presentation concerned meeting the needs of an increasingly diverse learning population, with particular emphasis given to our Afro-American student population.  Points included an exploration of who our learners are, staff reflexivity, and engagement.  Concerning our learners, I covered such matters as cultural dissonance, trust, and fate control.  Regarding staff reflexivity, I touched on epistemic dispositions and the relevance of implicit bias and teacher agency.  Lastly, I explored student engagement, which happens to be one major casualty of current education policy.  Along the way, I will sprinkle in some insights on education and ways forward.  My presentation will conclude with some analysis of the feedback I received from staff members.  This is particularly relevant since talking about diversity and race matters in education can be a contentious proposition. 

03:00 PM

Room 4016

What “white” people lose from white privilege and white supremacy in the U.S. context

Ian Hansen Saturday, May 20 3pm-3:50pm Room 4016 Often lost in the discussion of white privilege and white supremacy in the U.S. context are the ways in which the structures that foster them ironically disempower those categorized as "white."  This loss of power is a genuine loss, though overall part of a general loss of this agency for ordinary Americans—and all citizens of the world—of almost all categorizable identities (except, perhaps, for the wealthiest 0.1%).  Figures like Donald Trump have exploited the anxieties resulting from this disempowerment of many U.S. people and thus white people (the majority of U.S. voters) and channeled these anxieties into scapegoating of immigrants, Muslims, Black Lives Matter, LGBTQ, feminists and many other vulnerable and already oppressed, mistreated and violently targeted groups.  Instead of scapegoating oppressed groups and resistance movements as the "dangerous other", disaffected whites would be better served by reaching out to these groups and movements as allies.  But the obligation to reach out lies most heavily on the more privileged party.  As long as the gradient of white privilege and white supremacy exists, there will necessarily be a different flavor to more privileged parties reaching out to others upon whom existing structures have inflicted more oppression impoverishment and violence, and those experiencing this oppression reaching out to more privileged parties.  Both forms of reaching out make ultimate strategic sense insofar as there is a common structural enemy disempowering all.  However, those who have experienced more oppression should have that greater oppression acknowledged—and the role played by the relatively privileged in that oppression acknowledged also—before any kind of cautious trust and alliance makes reliable strategic sense.  The steadfastness of this call for acknowledgement and what might be reasonably called “repentance” tends to be the greatest stumbling block to an effective alliance between the more privileged and those more robbed of privilege among the disempowered, but it is a necessary one.

03:00 PM

Room 4014

Chicago Performs Non-Violence

Suellen Semekoski May, 20 3pm-3:50p, Room 4014 How can practices focused on two hands of non-violence and mediation generate lasting systemic change? How might mindfulness become a revolutionary force when embedded in social movements that target oppressive systems? What does a true mindful revolution look like? Join in the practice of mindfulness, embodied practice and walking meditation.
4pm

04:00 PM

Room 4052

Exploring Intersectionality of Sexuality and  Race, Religion, Family, and Sense of Community  

Antonio Champion, Norma Seldon, Shuaverta Miles Saturday, May 30 4pm04:50pm Room 4052 The presentation will focus on how the LGBT community is a very diversity and because it's a very diversity community their many issues an individual face beyond their sexual orientation. Individuals from this community are a sum of many parts that mean their many layers to whom they are as an individual from their racial/ethnic background, gender, religion and socioeconomic status. Many of these identities intersect with one another and individual may face microaggression or blunt discrimination base on their intersectionality within the LGBT community and outside of this community. 

04:00 PM

Room 4054

Inter-generational Trauma Within a South African Context

Haley Braun, Mindy C Siegert, Jasmine Alkhatib Saturday, May 20 4pm-4:50pm Room 4054 We will examine what is described in the literature about the transmission of intergenerational trauma within the South African context. Our definition of intergenerational trauma includes consideration of the historical oppression that has taken place across multiple generations in South Africa, as well as the negative psychological consequences that accompany it. This research informed a training session delivered to a non-governmental organization (NGO) trauma care center, called Ekupholeni, located near Johannesburg. Specifically, we will explore the significance of HIV/AIDS as a source of trauma. The particular trauma experienced by South African women will be examined. Finally, we will identify strategies to enable culturally competent training. The widespread nature of trauma in South Africa necessitates culturally sensitive and effective trauma care, which Ekupholeni, in partnership with The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, seeks to provide.

04:00 PM

Room 4020

How African Centered Education Can Derail the School to Prison Pipeline Presentation Description

Brandon Scates Saturday, May 20 4pm-4:50pm Room 4020 How African Centered Education Can Derail the School to Prison Pipeline is a presentation on my master thesis discussing how African Centered Education can serve as a mechanism to the school to prison pipeline, systemic miseducation, and institutional colonialism in inner city schools/educational institutions. There will be an analysis of African-Centered Schooling and Scholarship impact on the contemporary Black Liberation Movement. This is an ethnographic field study conducted in different urban communities throughout the African diaspora in North America. This research will be furthered at the doctoral level through educational, anthropology, political science, history, and other social science disciplines. Eventually, it will be published as a book which is entitled War on the Afrikan World Community: Academic Auction Block, Colonial Mentacide, and European Cultural Suicide.

04:00 PM

Room 5008

Immigration: Trespassing on the Plantation

Diallo Kenyatta Saturday, May 20 4pm-4:50pm Room 5008 As the federal government advances and intensifies anti-immigration policies and continues repression of Black citizens; we also see increasing tension between targeted and afflicted minority communities. I will examine the history of the phenomenon of oppressed groups identifying and targeting each other, as they come under greater State and majority oppression. I will also offer some rational and viable solutions for both infighting among targeted groups, and how they can better understand and oppose the true sources of their oppression and conflict.

04:00 PM

Room 4014

Gifted and Deprived: African American Children Underrepresented in Gifted Programs

Shenika Jackson Saturday, May 20 4pm-4:50pm Room 4014 It is no surprise that African American children have been treated "unequally" by the school system for centuries, and that slavery and systemic racism, continues to be the leading cause. From the obstacles and triumphs of the "Little Rock 9" to the strong and brave "Ruby Bridges" African Americans have fought long and hard to be included in a segregated school system that has been declared "unconstitutional" since the passing of the Brown v. Board of Education on May 17th 1954. In that time, African Americans saw some light at the end of the tunnel, with African Americans graduating from colleges and universities all over the country, proving that they deserved a right to a quality education just like any other ethnic group in the country. This roundtable discussion will focus on the consistent and unfair treated of African American children in gifted programs in the public school system. Discussions on Brown v. Board of Education, Little Rock 9, and the decision to integrate the schools will be re-visited, with a discussion on how the system has found ways to "exclude" African American children from schools and programs, even after school segregation was ruled "unconstitutional." Solutions to challenge the system will also be discussed.

04:00 PM

Room 5019

One Hundred Fifty Black Men

Sonja Hilson Saturday, May 20 4pm-4:50pm Room 5019 This study examines varying factors that have contributed to African American men and their attitudes about education. One-hundred fifty black men from the inner city and suburbs were surveyed on their academic motivators and areas of deterrence. The factors assessed include current and past demographics, community factors, academic achievement levels, early elementary years, incarceration, family obligations, addictions, gang affiliation, upbringing and personal beliefs. Indices were created which reflected observations. The primary finding was that negative academic attitudes were associated with a lack of black role models, and positive attitudes were associated with active youth participation in extra-curricular activities.
Wrap-Up

05:00 PM

Atrium

Protest Music Writing Presentation and Songs of Resistance Open Mic

A short video showcasing the protest music writing in workshop, as well as songs from participants, and an open mic session for all in community with us. There will be hor d' oeuvres, spirits, and music in celebration of our work and praxis.
Sessions 2016

2016 Archive

2016 SESSION INFORMATION HAS BEEN ARCHIVED BELOW

06:00 PM

National Louis University Atruim

Resistance Through Capoeira

by Vernon Lindsay, PhD 

Friday, April 8 6-6:50 PM National Louis University Atrium Vernon Lindsay Capoeira Lecture and Participatory Demonstration Roda.

09:00 PM

The Innovation Room

Art of Resistance: Seeing Power

by Rochele Royster  , Monica Trinidad  , Charles Deeda DeShields  , Brittney Williams  , Alex Wells Shapiro  ,

The Art of Resistance: Seeing Power National Louis University/ Racial Justice in Praxis Conference April 8-9, 2016 Gallery Hours: Friday, 8-10 PM Saturday, 9-7 PM 122 South Michigan Avenue Chicago Illinois 60603 Curator: Rochele A. Royster The Art of Resistance: Seeing Power features artists who focus on themes involving racial justice/injustice, collaboration, resistance and liberation.  This exhibition explores how art is a form of resistance for people as they combat and heal from generational trauma caused by structural and systemic racism. This exhibit is presented in conjunction with Racial Justice in Praxis Conference and is an intergenerational exhibition that includes work from professional artists, art students, psychologists, high school students and art therapists.  The Innovation Room at NLU will be transformed into a space of art that reflects themes of resistance, collaboration and liberation through art and art making.

11:00 AM

Room 5032

Law Panel

Saturday April 8 All Day Session Room 5032 Lawyers will convene after the panel to discuss next steps and strategies.

11:00 AM

Room 5006

Hip Hop as Healer- Hip Hop as Psychological Warfare

Saturday April 911-11:50 AM Room 5006 Adeye Cartman, PhD, Obari Cartman In this presentation we will examine the impact of the rhythm, sounds, images and lyrics of hip-hop on the thoughts and emotions of its young audiences. I will present strategies to engage young people in critical thinking conversations about corporate hip-hop. We will discuss the influence of problematic lyrics and images on the wellbeing of young people in the contexts of the industries that produce and profit from them. In addition, we will explore examples of songs and videos that can be used to facilitate productive conversations about a variety of topics relevant to mental health professionals, including addiction, relationships, education, emotional numbness, decision making and racial identity. Implications for application in therapy, groups and in school settings will be discussed.

11:00 AM

Room 5028

Gone But Not Forgotten

Saturday April 8 11- 11:50AM Room 5028 Rachel Wallis Gone But Not Forgotten is a community quilting project creating a memorial quilt for victims of police violence. In this workshop, structured as combination quilting circle and peace circle, we discuss racism, police accountability, transformative justice, and community safety. The workshops are facilitated by circle keepers and sewing instructors. Presenters will facilitate an artist talk and presentation. A drop in space for quilting will be provided on Saturday for those who would like to quilt around issues of civil rights and protest.

11:00 AM

Room 5030

Storytelling as Healing & Resistance

Saturday April 9 11-11:50 AM Room 5030 Cities of Peace Young people in Chicago and Phnom Penh are separated by language, culture, and nearly 9,000 miles of Pacific Ocean. What aligns their experiences are shared histories of state and interpersonal violence and generational trauma. As we mark the fortieth anniversary of the Khmer Rouge genocide which took the lives of nearly one in four Cambodians, a group of Chicago activists organized under “We Charge Genocide” petition the United Nations to recognize a global epidemic of police violence that disproportionately impacts young people of color as well as queer, trans, and gender nonconforming youth from marginalized communities.

11:00 AM

Room 5026

Empowering Black Women Movement

Saturday April 9 11-11:30 AM Room 5007 Patricia Luckoo The Empowering Black Women Movement, mission is to provide a platform for black women to share their stories and experiences of racial discrimination and oppression in America. Despite indisputable and prevalent research showing that Black women, on average, experience much greater deficit in wage, poverty, underemployment/unemployment, social status, lack of education, housing, health problems, physical/mental/ emotional abuse, poor self-image, discrimination, racism and sexism among other challenges, compared to White women and other ethnic groups, there exists no real policies in place to addressing and resolving these societal concerns. Part of the problem is that Black women are gravely underrepresented in society, and when we are represented, we are misrepresented with negative narratives and images mired in destructive stereotypes that perpetuates the dehumanization. The Empowering Black Women Movement is about giving black women a platform to tell their stories using social media, blogs, newsletters, magazines as well as working with community organizations to hold educational and leadership events promoting personal and community growth.

11:00 AM

Room 5026

The Effect of Mass Incarceration on African-american Parents and Their Children

Saturday, April 9 11-11:50 AM Room 5026 Lashawn Littrice A roundtable discussion regarding Mass Incarceration and the Effects on African-American Parents and their children. There are many children who grow up having the experience of seeing their parents go away to prison. How do they keep the relationship solid? Does the criminal justice system foster continuity in relationships or do mothers and fathers get lost in the shuffle? What are the dynamics of these relationships? How can children be successful? What are the long-term effects of mass incarceration on these relationships? I would like to talk about these issues and open the floor for discussion..

01:00 PM

Room 5006

A Study of the Masters: Parallels in Modern Art and US Empire

Saturday April 9 1-1:50 PM Room 5006 Michael Ryan Noble This presentation begins with a discussion of artists that make work about radical politics and racial justice. These artists include Favianna Rodriguez, Dred Scott, Stephanie Syjuco and Ernesto Yerena. The artist then discusses his personal background with race relations including estrangement from his paternal Mexican lineage and his school years during the LA uprising s of the 90’s. Ultimately, he frames his conception of identity as a professional white male and a “colonized body.” The artist shares insights into the ways art institutions sustain privilege, while describing various strategies for dissolving these limitations. These strategies include performance art as protest, community art projects, and online/print media collectives. Concluding this presentation the artist details his current painting series “a study of the masters.” The paintings are based on “master” compositions from the Classical era, re-casted with political “masters” of US empire, and rendered in the style of modern art “masters” in order to reveal traditions of structural power across several institutions.  

01:00 PM

Room 5028

Countering Violent Extremism

Saturday April 9 1-1:50 PM Room 5028 Alice LoCicero My work in understanding what social and political factors contribute to youth engaging in violence, including joining groups that use tactics deemed to be "terrorism," has led me to challenge the problematic government program called by various names, including "Countering Violent Extremism." Concern has been raised in "pilot" cities, including Boston. Organizations including American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, CAIR, and the ACLU consider this program to be seriously problematic. Recently, the CVE program has been promoted under innocent sounding names like "Community Resilience" and has been quietly and insidiously affecting community approaches to prevention, offering financial incentives that require placing an unwarranted focus on Muslim youth. There is a push underway by CVE advocates to reach out to mental health professionals and encourage providers to view Muslim clients with suspicion and report them for what amount to normal and innocuous thoughts and behavior. While some have imagined this to be well-meaning but misguided, the evidence suggests that it is more likely a deliberate attempt to support anti-Muslim sentiment. Such efforts lead to further xenophobia, anti-immigrant attitudes, and endorsement for wars in the middle east. This, in turn, benefits military suppliers. I will discuss ways under consideration to counter this program, in hopes of raising awareness and garnering suppo

01:00 PM

Room 5007

Promoting Pacification Instead of Peace: How Pacification is Anti-Peace and Sustains Violence and Racial Oppression

Saturday April 9 1-1:50 PM Room 5007 Diallo Kenyatta  Violence and crime are likely in the top 5, if not at the top of the list, of concerns for the Black community in Chicago and abroad. There are many organizations and initiatives established to prevent, curb, or respond to what has come to be called Black-on-Black violence. Most efforts target violence among the Black population through peace initiatives and justice activism. Observation and community involvement confirms that these efforts in actuality sustain systems of injustice. When advocating or working towards pacification, in place of peace, a surrender to violence is imposed from a myriad of sources, thus neutralizing mobilized individuals, which serves to further perpetuate the violence from which they sought refuge through the programming that claimed to oppose it. A roundtable conversation of empowerment for justice instead of pacification, will follow a short introduction of actions which might potentially target real sources of violence.

01:00 PM

Room 5031

Challenging Progressive Institutions: Moving Toward Liberation

by Leslie MacFadyen 

Saturday, April 9 1-1:50 Room 5031 Response Network Leslie Macfadyen This panel discussion will center on how we are liberation advocates & freedom fighters challenge institutions never meant to accommodate Blackness & Black people. Where does "the work" lie when confronting established liberal/progressive institutions.

01:00 PM

Room 503

Anti-Oppression Work Within Oppressive Institutions and Systems

Saturday, April 9 1-1:50 AM Room 5031 Ashley Ray and Nancy Arvold Roundtable discussion: How do we survive and succeed in environments and within systems which are inherently oppressive? As we become more and more radicalized and as we experience alienation and dehumanization while working within and being educated by these systems, how do we survive with our radical and liberatory ideals intact? How do we manage the cognitive dissonance of knowing that these institutions are oppressive, yet we are choosing to enter them professionally and stay within them for long periods of time? What does it look like when we're existing within these systems and working for liberation on the inside? How do we take care of ourselves and how do we stay true to our values?

01:00 PM

Room 5030

What the Documents Say About America’s Post 9/11 Torture Program

Saturday April 9 1-1:50 PM Room 5030 Amber Ginsburg, Aaron Hughes, Aliya Hana Hussein, Larry Siems Tea Project artists Amber Ginsburg and Aaron Hughes together with Aliya Hana Hussain from the Center for Constitutional Rights and Larry Siems, author of Guantanamo Diary and The Torture Report: What the Documents Say About America’s Post 9/11 Torture Program, invite you to a roundtable discussion. This roundtable will present diverse strategies used to mobilize and educate communities and the public-at-large on a range of social justice issues, including legal initiatives, journalistic approaches, tea cups (art), dialogue, identity politics and media and advocacy campaigns.

01:00 PM

Room 5052

Yoga and Spirituality

Saturday April 9 1-1:50 Room 5052 Tameka Walton Yoga and Spirituality: Allowing your life to be a living prayer. We will discuss and explore how trauma is stored in our bodies and process how we use these trials and tribulations to become greater advocates for ourselves and others. I will share my community work in which I bring yoga to urban black and brown environments and share the importance of healing through health, meditation and nutrition. This will be a workshop/ yoga class.

02:00 PM

Room 5030

Health And Racial Inequities In African American Communities

Saturday, April 9 2-2:50 Room 5030 Tonya Roberson A significant part of the South Side (SS) of Chicago communities has been overshadowed by many challenges including the lack of and access to basic health and social resources. Health and racial inequities in African American (AA) communities have been widely documented, although, there is very little known about how to reduce these disparities. However in the midst of the disparities, the SS of Chicago is rich in history, education, cultural and oral traditions. Examples of these traditions are the church and gospel music which play an integral role in the AA family life. Historically the cultural life line of the AA community has been wholesome and a place where “call and response” is the communicative strategy used to promote AA survival, advancement and well-being. The history of poetry dates back to the days of slavery when AA slaves would sing “call and response” type songs out in the work fields to secretly communicate with one another so the overseer could not understand. There are poetic ties in the call and response gospel preaching, music and songs in the churches. Such traditions are meant to raise awareness, spirit and to celebrate life. Other traditions are deeply rooted in rap songs, oral storytelling, personal testimonies, and rhythms and rhymes. This panel will discuss ways in which an understanding of literature from cultural communication and an in-depth understanding of intercultural contact can assist in developing needed strategies to promote poetic health education that includes: active involvement of pastors, physicians, community poets, and members. This panel will discuss the potential phenomenon, design and use of poetry as a form of art and an excellent vehicle to “meet people where they are” and educate AA communities on the importance of good health as well as express the nuances of race and health inequities.

02:00 PM

Room 5007

The Impact Of Staffing Poor Performing Public Schools With First Year Educators

Saturday, April 9 2-2:50 Room 5007 Dana M. Burke and Ericka Mingo Discuss the impact of staffing the poorest performing public schools within underserved communities with first year/change of career educators without a cultural connection to the families they serve. Discuss why this hiring occurs within these communities and the many different ways the students, families, and communities are impacted. I would like to share and be a part of the discussion as an educator/administrator with 21 years experience in the parochial, Chicago Public Schools, and independent school system as well as a parent of children who have been students in catholic, public, and independent schools.

02:00 PM

Room 5031

Finding Voice And Inspiring Liberation

Saturday, April 9 2-2:50 PM Room 5031 Mary Pelton-Cooper and Cynthia Leblow A reading of narrative and poetry, by Audre Lorde and other authors, focusing on themes of finding voice and inspiring liberation. Discussion and Reflection to follow.

02:00 PM

Room 5028

The Carefree Black Girl Movement

Saturday, April 9 2-2:50 PM Room 5028 Brittney Miles The Carefree Black Girl Movement, a movement primarily taking place on social media, celebrates diverse and liberating ideologies of black womanhood. This illustrates an active protest against oppressive stereotypes imposed upon black women. This case study offers an opportunity to critically explore the ways in which postmodern ideas about identity and emancipation are currently being utilized by black women in the Carefree Black Girl Movement. By considering sociological deconstructionist concepts regarding liberation from oppressive forms of knowledge and stereotypes, the Carefree Black Girl Movement serves as a place of resistance against harmful racialized meanings and limiting conceptions of black womanhood.

02:00 PM

Room 5032

​People’s Responses to Police Terror

Saturday, April 92-2:50 PM Room 5032 Daniela Kantorova and Monica Trinidad This workshop will introduce the work of first responders committee of the Anti Police-Terror Project in Oakland. First responders conduct independent people's investigations of police murders and provide support to impacted families. This work can significantly benefit from engagement of mental health professionals working as healers, trainers, and investigators. ​Joining Daniela Kantorova will be Monica Trinidad, formerly part of the We Charge Genocide effort and one of the eight young activists who went to the United Nations in 2014 to deliver a report on police violence in Chicago to the Committee Against Torture. ​She will be speaking on Chicago's effort to launch their own People's Response Team, inspired by the Anti-Police Terror Project.

02:00 PM

Room 5006

Moral Injury in Communities of Color

by John Ziegler  , Troy Harden, EdD, LCSW  , David J. Rogers  , L. Anton Seals  ,

Saturday, April 9 2-2:50 Room 5006
This workshop explores the impact of moral injury in communities of color. Moral injury is a term used to describe the circumstances that impact individuals when they are asked to do something against their moral ethic, betraying their sense of what is right. Mostly associated with the military, it implies that there are circumstances embedded within violent and oppressive conflict that create ambiguous and transgressive acts that impact the moral and social fiber of individuals and groups. Some believe that the racialized system of the U.S., particularly the conflictual nature of relationships between institutions, such as with police and communities of color, create a type of moral injury where ones sense of “being” is wrong, creating a similar moral conflict in both survivors of trauma and the institutions surrounding them. Called spirit injury by Williams and Black Injury recently by King, it is the attack on bodies of color by institutional forces that can lead to guilt, shame, and anger in association with these institutions. Neo-liberal respectability politics and conservative discourse suggests Sandra Bland, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, and Laquan McDonald were “wrong” respectively for talking back to an officer, wearing a hoodie, selling “loosies”, and simply walking while being under the influence. International attention has been garnered as a result of the deaths of these individuals, yet many encounter the stress of physical and emotional encounters with these institutions daily. This workshop explores how oppressive conditions lead institutions to create moral ambiguity among militarized institutions, ultimately creating racialized and sexist hostility towards the individuals they protect and serve, leading to racial and gendered injury. Reviewing DePaul University’s Egan Office’s Police and Mutlifaith Veterans Project, we explore the development of restorative practices in transforming trauma survivor narratives of guilt and shame and institutional neglect, towards communal accountability, healing and transformation.

03:00 PM

Room 5032

Response Art to Sounds of Protest and Resistance

Saturday, April 9 3-3:50 Room 5032 Justin James and Rochele Royster Artist and historian, Justin James along with art therapist and teacher, Rochele Royster will facilitate a participatory arts integrated workshop in response to footage and spoken word audio from protests and events surrounding the Black Lives Matter Movement events, Social Justice protests and happenings. During this workshop, participants will create art in response to the spoken word and music compiled into five powerful musical compositions by Justin.

03:00 PM

Room 5006

The Soft Skills Gap

Saturday April 9 3-3:50 AM Room 5006 Mimi Li One of the most pernicious gaps facing disadvantaged communities of color is the soft skills gap. Drawing on my experiences in academia, the business world, and work with Section 8 residents, I make the case that there is a soft skills gap that disproportionately impact communities of color. My presentation will walk the audience through real-life examples of situations in which soft skills make the difference in developing a professional relationship, getting a job, and effectively advocating for oneself. After walking through the case studies, I will issue a call to action to attendees of the conference to help mitigate the effects of this gap by seeking out mentees from disadvantaged communities, creating partnerships with social service agencies, and explicitly working with mentees, patients, and clients on the soft skills that will help make them successful and open doors to opportunities. There will be a discussion session after the main presentation so members of the audience can ask questions, bring up topics of discussion, and invite others to network with them later at the conference.

03:00 PM

Room 5052

Education: Status Quo Masquerading As A Great Equalizer

Saturday April 9 3-3:50 AM Room 5028 Ericka Mingo The city of Chicago is facing a crisis in education. School budgets have been cut, and students will missed a day of school in March for the purpose of answering widening gaps in resources. While the budget lacks, the city spends heavily on charter schools and magnet institutions.

03:00 PM

Room 5031

Creating a Culture of Resistance

by Charles Deeda DeShields 

Saturday, April 9 3-3:50 Room 5031 Charles Deeda DeSheilds “To the victor goes the spoils." This quote explains that the spoils of victory are the extra bonuses, perks, and treasure you get for winning ultimately; whoever wins gets to write the story.  An examination of the history of European imperialism and colonialism gives the impression that the "Natives", were lining up to be civilized. The truth is, that people resisted, and people continue to resist. Cultural resistance is defined as, the broad use of arts, literature, and traditional practices to challenge or fight unjust or oppressive systems and/or power holders within the context of nonviolent actions, campaigns and movements. This Workshop will explore the gaps within this philosophy. By examining  "Creating A Culture Of Resistance" we will examine building community, through health and martial arts. This workshop will highlight: - historical and contemporary resistance movements -incorporating healthy behaviors in daily life -physical health techniques and self defense strategies/ techniques The goal of this workshop is to highlight the benefits of health by promoting the importance of creating a culture of resistance through movement and academia.

03:00 PM

Room 5007

The Power of the Story: Giving Voice to Racial Injustice through Oral History

Saturday, April 9 3-3:50 PM Room 5007 Ipek Burnett The Power of the Story: Giving Voice to Racial Injustice through Oral History With its grassroots approach and use of first-person narratives, oral history has a unique ability to reach people. By revealing the very human face of systematic oppression and abuse, it has the power to provide a complex and nuanced understanding of social and political struggles, fostering both compassion and critical thinking that are essential to civic engagement. In this workshop, we will review the practical and ethical guidelines for conducting oral history interviews and disseminating the voices of those individuals and communities that are often unheard in the mainstream media or dominant national narratives. We will then discuss the ways in which we can draw on community-based stories to further the work of racial justice.

03:00 PM

Room 5026

How to Create Culturally Inclusive Institutions & Settings: A Listening Session

by Tiffeny Jimenez, PhD 

Saturday, April 9   3PM-4PM Room 5026 There are a variety of institutional settings that diverse populations seek out in order to be supported and to thrive. However, the historical context of our society influences institutional practices that may be unintentionally upholding a variety of marginalizing and discriminatory practices based on a seemingly invisible dominant cultural narrative. Institutions can include: advocacy organizations, national societies, and programming within higher education, for example. Therefore, if we are to advance into promoting more ethically-based practices that best serve the people we seek to represent, we must acknowledge that creating culturally diverse and inclusive organizational, educational, and community settings is both a challenge and a necessity. To be authentic in this aim takes sincere commitment, openness, and desire to honestly be open to changing existing paradigms about what seems like business as usual within these institutions. We are up to this challenge. As the Committee on Ethnic and Racial Affairs (CERA) within the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA), we recognize the importance of more closely examining our professional worldviews and we want to learn from others what common institutional practices may be unintentionally marginalizing or discriminating against people who identify with minority perspectives. We seek to develop institutional practices grounded in valuing diverse viewpoints and visions for the future. Currently, the SCRA is in the early stages of reorganizing much of their ongoing practices and we hope to garner the knowledge and insight needed to ensure this reorganization does not simply recreate the pitfalls of the past. We plan to host a round table listening session on this topic to find out how we can avoid common pitfalls and create more socially just functioning institutions that can truly live up to their values.

03:00 PM

Room 5028

Global Crisis: Stories Of Lesvos

Saturday, April 9 11-11:50 Room 5028 Mona Abuhamda PhD and Munem Maaruf This presentation is based on the personal accounts of independent volunteers as well as refugees arriving on the shores of Lesvos. The stories of those abandoning their homes to flee the senseless war and injustice and those who abandon their homes to respond to the insatiable void created by the pitiful neglect of governments around the world. The presentation aims to expose the brutality of this insurmountable global crisis and to raise awareness and call for action to end this tragedy. An open forum discussion will then allow participants to explore the issue in depth and potentially come up with a plan of action moving forward.

04:00 PM

The Atruim

Social Justice at Play: Healing & Refueling Via A Multicultural Drum Circle

by Ugochi  , Gilo Kwesi Logan  , Daniel Cohen  , Rahul Sharma, Psy.D  ,

“Let’s not forget . . . our ancestors want all of us to be together.” -Baba Meshach Silas, Founding drummer/percussionist, Funkadesi Making a community whole and just begins with accepting parts of ourselves that have been affected by issues of oppression.   How can cultural wisdoms from various musical traditions inform our work as practitioners, teachers, and trainers of diversity, social justice, and multicultural competence?  How do issues of power, privilege, cultural pride, humility, and other relevant issues affect us both personally and professionally?  How can we draw upon our own cultural learning & ancestral inspiration, as well as those from other cultures, so that we may heal ourselves, each other, and continue the necessary work to deal with racism and other forms of oppression?  Through a combination of experiential drumming and facilitated dialogue, practitioners will emphasize the need for healing in anti-racism and social justice work.  All are invited to co-create a safe space for self-discovery, identity affirmation, and healing.  The skills and insights gained from this forum is not limited to the use of music in workshop/teaching/training sessions.  [Ideal number of participants:  6 to 50.] Drawing upon over two decades of professional musical experience, including founding, performing, and leading workshops with intercultural music group Funkadesi – a musical/educational collaboration of Indian-American, African-American, Jamaican, Latino, and European-American artists and activists, Rahul Sharma, also a Clinical Psychologist, will briefly share practical experiences and reflections that integrate world music concepts with psychological phenomena relevant to multicultural work.  He will be joined by anti-racism activist and educator Daniel Cohen, and members of the music group Funkadesi.  Together, workshop leaders will lead a hands-on, no-talent-required multicultural drum circle, allowing audience members to interact non-verbally, through music.  Finally, workshop leaders will invite audience members to reflect on their experiences and what insights they have gained. 2nd Workshop: Creative Expression As A Means of Sharing Our Truths (Can be a part II of previous workshop) Through spoken word and other forms of expression, workshop participants will be invited to express their truths related to their struggles with anti-racism and anti-oppression work.  Co-facilitated by vocalist, spoken word artist, and educator Ugochi and Rahul Sharma, and with members of Funkadesi serving as an improvisatory "house band," all are invited for this exploration in expression and sharing stories.
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